Before his nomination for the 29th American President, Warren G. Harding declared, "America's present need is not heroics, but healing; not nostrums, but normalcy; not revolution, but restoration; not agitation, but adjustment; not surgery, but serenity; not the dramatic, but the dispassionate; not experiment, but equipoise; not submergence in internationality, but sustainment in triumphant nationality..." A Democratic leader, William Gibbs McAdoo, called Harding's speeches "an army of pompous phrases moving across the landscape in search of an idea." Their very murkiness was effective, since Harding's pronouncements remained unclear on the League of Nations, in contrast to the impassioned crusade of the Democratic candidates, Governor James M. Cox of Ohio and Franklin D. Roosevelt. Thirty-one distinguished Republicans had signed a manifesto assuring voters that a vote for Harding was a vote for the League. But Harding interpreted his election as a mandate to stay out of the League of Nations. Early Years Warren Harding, born ...

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Like Roosevelt before him, Woodrow Wilson, the 28th President of the United States, regarded himself as the personal representative of the people. "No one but the President," he said, "seems to be expected ... to look out for the general interests of the country." He developed a program of progressive reform and asserted international leadership in building a new world order. In 1917 he proclaimed American entrance into World War I a crusade to make the world "safe for democracy." Early Life Wilson had seen the horrors that a war caused when he was just a child. He was born in Virginia in 1856, the son of a Presbyterian minister who was a pastor in Augusta, Georgia, during the Civil War. During the Reconstruction Era, his father became a professor in the charred city of Columbia, South Carolina. After graduation from Princeton (then the College of New Jersey) and the University of Virginia ...

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Relations between American and Cuba look like they are finally about to thaw after a 50 year freeze and it seems that Americans from across the board are now happy with the changes taking place. According to a report by Reuters, a new poll taken across the country has shown the majority of the bipartisan voters in the country are now supporting the measures being brought in by President Obama in relation to Cuba with many stating that they would be happy to see an end to to economic embargo against the island. Beyond the Beltway released the poll as part of a joint public polling initiative by Washington-based research consultants Benenson Strategy Group and SKDKnickerbocker. The broad poll also found that most American voters support expanding trade, travel, and diplomatic relations with Havana. According to Reuters,  of those polled some 64 percent of those surveyed supported ending the embargo, including 74 percent of ...

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Distinguished jurist, effective administrator, but poor politician, William Howard Taft spent four uncomfortable years as the  27th President of the United States. Large, jovial, conscientious, he was caught in the intense battles between Progressives and conservatives, and got scant credit for the achievements of his administration. He is the only man who has served as both a president and later as a Chief Justice of the United States. Early Life Born in 1857, the son of a distinguished judge, William Howard Taft graduated from Yale, and then returned to Cincinnati to study and practice law. He rose in politics through Republican judiciary appointments, through his own competence and availability, and because, as he once wrote facetiously, he always had his "plate the right side up when offices were falling." Path to the White House William Howard Taft much preferred law to politics. He was appointed a Federal circuit judge at 34. His goal was ...

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With the assassination of President McKinley, Theodore Roosevelt, not quite 43, became the 26th President in the Nation's history. He was the youngest president to serve in the highest office of the government. He brought new excitement and power to the office, vigorously leading Congress and the American public toward progressive reforms and a strong foreign policy. He took the view that the President as a "steward of the people" should take whatever action necessary for the public good unless expressly forbidden by law or the Constitution." I did not usurp power," he wrote, "but I did greatly broaden the use of executive power." Early Years Theodore Roosevelt's youth was very different from that of the preceding “log cabin” Presidents. He was born in New York City in 1858 into a wealthy family, but he too struggled against poor health, and in his triumph became a supporter of the well-lived life. In 1884, his ...

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You would think that of all the potential candidates for the race for the White House in 2016, Jeb Bush would have the inside track on how to make it work, after all he is the brother of one former president and the son of another, but it seems that Jeb Bush may have the name but he is far from being similar to his family members. Jeb Bush does not exude the confidence of his famous family members and comes across as being far more introverted which can be seen as a positive by many but has made it undoubtedly difficult for him to be able to connect with members of the public, something which is key to turning in the votes in the early stages. The question of being the third member of the Bush family to stand for president is also somewhat of a double edged sword for Jeb ...

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Recent revelations about a private email account held by Hillary Clinton could not have turned up at a worse time for the potential presidential candidate but it turns out that donors to the Democrat party have been unfazed by the scandal. According to a report by Reuters, some of the top donors to the Democrat party have not let the issues about the private email account held by Hillary Clinton while she was Secretary of State put them of supporting her. The issue over the email account, which has been making headlines in the US since last week could have damaged Hillary Clinton’s prospects of becoming the front runner for the White House from the Democrats, especially as she had managed to largely avoid any controversy in recent years. While Hillary Clinton has played down the claims and has urged for transparency in the case it has led members of the Republican party ...

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Last week it was all about Hillary Clinton and he emails, now her husband and former President Bill Clinton has found himself in the spotlight again but for all the wrong reasons. Bill Clinton spent time over the weekend defending donations that his family charity is given from governments abroad. Critics are claiming that these donations from foreign governments could potentially create a conflict of interest if his wife Hillary runs for and is elected as president in 2016. According to a report by Reuters,  Clinton said it was possible to work with foreign governments even if one disagrees with some things they do, and that it was acceptable for them to donate to the Clinton Foundation if the donations are publicly disclosed. "I think it's a good thing," he said onstage at a youth conference organized by the foundation at the University of Miami during an interview with Larry Wilmore, a television talk-show ...

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The CIA (Central Intelligence Agency) is planning to make enormous changes to the agency with a new focus on cyber crime. In what is seen as one of the biggest changes to the agency in its 70 year history, the CIA director John Brennan has said that the agency will be focusing effort firmly on cyber operations and incorporating digital innovations. According to a report by Reuters, Brennan said he is creating new units within the CIA, called "mission centres," intended to concentrate the agency's focus on specific challenges or geographic areas, such as weapons proliferation or Africa. He added that the CIA is to establish a new "Directorate of Digital Innovation" to lead efforts to track and take advantage of advances in cyber technology to gather intelligence. The changes within the CIA are to attempt to keep up with the rapidly changing landscape of technology. According to Reuters, Brennan said the new digital directorate ...

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At the 1896 Republican Convention, in time of depression, the wealthy Cleveland businessman Marcus Alonzo Hanna ensured the nomination of his friend William McKinley as "the advance agent of prosperity." The Democrats, advocating the "free and unlimited coinage of both silver and gold"--which would have mildly inflated the currency--nominated William Jennings Bryan. While Hanna used large contributions from eastern Republicans frightened by Bryan's views on silver, McKinley met delegations on his front porch in Canton, Ohio. William McKinley won the office of American President by the largest majority of popular votes since 1872. Early Years Born in Niles, Ohio, in 1843, William McKinley attended Allegheny College for a short time, and then he was teaching in a country school when the Civil War broke out. Enlisting as a private in the Union Army, he was mustered out at the end of the war as a brevet major of volunteers. He decided to study ...

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