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An avid reader, I consistently engage myself in the areas of current affairs and understanding of international relations, whilst at the same time, am interested in the area of economics and understanding the roles of economic concerns in the political economy. You can follow The Heralding on Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest & Google+. Alternatively subscribe to our newsletter to be kept up to date with the latest articles on the Heralding.

Photo Credit: US News As the Iowa caucuses begins its drawdown, most Politicians are clamouring for a piece of media action - but not Donald Trump. What made Thursday Night's debate one of the most unusual debate nights in history was that it was a showdown without a front-runner. Donald Trump skipped the debate, claiming Fox News and moderator Megyn Kelly were biased against him. That left seven rivals on stage, just four days before the Iowa caucuses: Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio, Ben Carson, Chris Christie, Jeb Bush, John Kasich and Rand Paul. Trump held his own event at the same time at Drake University, setting up a split-screen kind of evening. Below are some of the key highlights that happened during the debates. Mockery of Donald Trump continues Ted Cruz, who is very much expected to win the Iowa Primary, opened the debate with a sarcastic impression of Donald Trump's frequent insults of his opponents. "I'm a ...

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Top U.S. military commanders, who only a few months ago were planning to pull the last American troops out of Afghanistan by year's end, are now quietly talking about an American commitment that could keep thousands of troops in the country for decades. This change is in part down to US President Barack Obama's reversal of his earlier plans for the final pullout. Political commentators believe this is mainly down to the Afghan government's vulnerability to continued militant assault and its terrain and geographical proximity to the Middle East, which has allowed terrorist organisations such as  al-Qaeda to continue to build training camps and continue their operations. The military outlook mirrors arguments made by many Republican and Democrat foreign policy advisers, looking beyond the Obama presidency, for a significant long-term American presence. "This is not a region you want to abandon," said Michèle Flournoy according to the Washington Post. She is a former Pentagon ...

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Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders on Monday drew their sharpest contrasts yet in hard-hitting final pitches to Iowa voters as the competitive race to win the first in the nation caucuses enters its last week, with solid passionate pleas for supporters to caucus on February 1. Sanders offered a vigorous performance punctuated by calls for a progressive revolution. Clinton matched him for energy by arguing that only she had been on the front lines of progressive change for decades and uniquely had the multi-tasking skills at home and abroad needed of a President. "It's hard," she said. "If it were easy, hey, there wouldn't be any contest. But it's not easy. There are very different visions, different values, different forces at work, and you have to have somebody who is a proven fighter -- somebody who has taken them on and won, and kept going, and will do that as President." Sanders, going ...

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A U.S. Treasury official said the United States considers Russian President Vladimir Putin to be corrupt and that it has known this for "many, many years,"according to the report by BBC. Adam Szubin, acting Treasury secretary for terrorism and financial crimes, said in an interview with BBC Panorama that the President had portrayed a "picture of corruption". "We've seen him enriching his friends, his close allies and marginalizing those who he doesn't view as friends using state assets. Whether that's Russia's energy wealth, whether it's other state contracts, he directs those to whom he believes will serve him and excludes those who don't. To me, that is a picture of corruption," Szubin was quoted as saying. The BBC report said Szubin declined to comment on a 2007 Central Intelligence Agency report that estimated Putin's wealth at $40 billion, but he said the Russian leader's stated wealth is an underestimation. "He supposedly draws a state ...

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Photo credit: Ben Baker/REDUX, Politico President Barack Obama offered a boost to Hillary Clinton's argument that an experienced candidate is needed to succeed him at the White House, while also rebutting comparisons between his 2008 campaign and Bernie Sanders. In a candid 40-minute interview for POLITICO’s Off Message podcast, the President couldn’t hide his inclination towards the former Secretary, whom he seems to suggest better understands the pragmatic demands of a presidency in what he likened to "the world’s most challenging walk-and-chew-gum exercise". A week before the Iowa caucuses launch the nominating process, Clinton is working to link her campaign more closely to the president and garner more support from his backers. She is arguing that while Sanders is arguing for laudable goals, some are unobtainable and he lacks the experience to tackle a wide range of issues. Obama, who remains very popular within his own Democratic Party, has said he will not endorse ...

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Photo Credit: Reuters Sarah Palin endorsed Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump at a rally in Ames, Iowa, on Tuesday night, near John Wayne stadium. Trump is holding onto his lead in Iowa where the caucuses are less than two weeks away. In a report by the Washington Post, Palin’s endorsement is a much-needed boost for Trump’s campaign in the state, as it saw a surge of Republican caucus-goers supporting Sen. Ted Cruz. In the past two and a half months, support for Cruz has gone up in various national polls, which pushed him into second place among the Republican presidential candidates. In fact, his popularity almost led to a tie between him and Trump in Iowa. And it is this threat posed by Cruz in Iowa that has perhaps lead to the reignition of the "birthier issue", and now Palin's endorsement would come as a shot in the arm that could help Trump ...

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Photo Credits: AP Politicians in the US have blocked a bill that would have made it harder for Syrian and Iraqi refugees to enter the country. The result of Wednesday’s vote was 55-43, with "yes" votes falling short of the 60 needed after Democrats refused to support the Republican-backed measure in the 100-member Senate. No Republicans voted against the bill, and only two Democrats backed it. Among other things, the bill would have required high-level US officials to verify that each refugee from Iraq and Syria posed no security risk before they were allowed into the US. Republicans said the tighter screening was essential to ensure the safety of Americans and prevent attacks within the country by Islamic State and other militant groups. "This bipartisan bill would allow Washington to step back, take a breath and ensure it has the correct policies and security screenings in place," Republican Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said in the ...

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Photo Credit: Reuters Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump has vowed to force Apple Inc. - America's most profitable manufacturer - to keep its production lines inside U.S. borders. The billionaire businessman used a speech at Liberty University on Monday to unveil his plan, which was skimpy on specifics about how he could force a private business to change its production strategies. But the real estate mogul did propose a 35 percent tax on businesses who produce their goods overseas despite claiming to support free trade, and having made his personal fortune as a free-market capitalist. Most of his wealth has been built as a developer through his real estate firm. 'We’re going to get Apple to build their damn computers and things in this country instead of other countries,' Trump said near the end of his speech, according to a report in the technology blog Gizmodo. The report noted that Apple already builds its Mac Pro ...

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Photo Credits: Huffington Post As Democrat Presidential forerunner Hilary Clinton slips behind polls in Iowa against fellow Democratic Socialist candidate Sen Bernie Sanders, the Clinton camp has launched an attack on her rival on one issue that has been fiercely discussed of late - gun control. During Barack Obama’s final State of the Union speech on Tuesday night, Hillary Clinton released an ad, titled I’m with Him, in which she aligned herself with the president on gun control. “It’s time to pick a side,” the Democratic candidate said in the ad, which aired on Wednesday in Iowa and New Hampshire, states which will vote next month in the first caucuses and primaries of 2016. “Either we stand with the gun lobby or we join the president and stand up to them. I’m with him.” While Clinton still maintains a lead over Sanders in national polls, the once overwhelming favourite for the nomination is ...

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Photo credit: AP President Barack Obama will make his last State of the Union address today (0200 GMT on Wednesday), outlining his aims for the remainder of his tenure and beyond, as well as reinforce his pre-existing ideals. These include garnering support for a Pacific trade pact, justification of his executive decision to introduce tighter gun laws and plans towards closure of the Guantanamo Bay prison, a promise he made during his campaigns for Presidency. The speech to a joint session of Congress will be the President's last few chances at the big stage. As with democratic tradition, the President is expected to stick to legacy themes and steer clear of new legislative proposals that his fellow Democrats on the presidential campaign trail are laying out themselves. According to Reuters, White House spokesman Josh Earnest on Monday blamed an "avalanche of negativity" from Republican candidates  noting that the President had seen his union address ...

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