Early Life of Dwight D. Eisenhower Dwight D. Eisenhower was born in Texas in 1890. The third of seven sons in the Eisenhower family, Dwight was raised in Abilene, Kansas. As a young student, he showed a promising potential in high school sports.  This resulted in an appointment to the West Point that assigned him as a second lieutenant in Texas. It was also in this period that he met Mamie Geneva Doud; they married in 1916. Eisenhower’s Military Prowess As a loyal member of the military, he undertook several assignments and missions under the leadership of General John J. Pershing, Douglas MacArthur, and Walter Krueger. When the Pearl Harbor was bombed by Japanese air forces, Dwight Eisenhower was assigned by General George C. Marshall to devise a war plan. In November 1942, he commanded the landing of Allied Forces in North Africa. Two years after, on D- Day, he headed the invasion ...

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Early Life of Harry S. Truman Harry Truman was born in 1884. He was born in Lamar, Missouri but grew up in Independence. For more than a decade, he ventured into the Missouri farming industry. At the time of World War I, he became part of the armed forces and was deployed to France to become a Field Artillery captain. He then became husband to Elizabeth Wallace. Together, they started dealing men’s clothing. Truman’s Crossover to Politics Despite owning multiple businesses, Harry Truman managed to be active in the Democratic Party. In 1922, he assumed the administrative position of being the Jackson County Court judge. After 12 years, he became a senator. When America entered World War II, Truman headed the investigating committee that audited corruption and savings. The committee saved 15 billion dollars. He even became more involved in public service when he was elected vice president to Franklin Roosevelt. While he ...

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Franklin D. Roosevelt came at considerably one of the worst periods in American history. As the 32nd President of the United States of America, he was tasked to rebuild the nation from the ashes of depression. Soon, he became the nation’s beacon of hope and recovery. Early Life of Franklin D. Roosevelt Franklin Roosevelt was born in 1882 at New York. He completed his studies at Harvard University and furthered his involvement in the academe at Columbia Law School. He is also a husband to Eleanor Roosevelt. Gaining inspiration from his cousin, President Theodore Roosevelt, he involved himself in the political arena. He joined the Democrats and became a senator in 1910. Roosevelt was also appointed by then President Wilson as the Navy’s Assistant Secretary. He quickly gained a significant following in the elites and masses and became the vice presidential bet of the Democratic Party in 1920. Roosevelt vs Polio One year after his nomination ...

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Herbert Hoover is the 31st President of the United States. Dwelling in a rich background of volunteerism and international work even before he entered politics, Hoover quickly became known as ‘The Great Humanitarian.’ Early Life of Herbert Hoover Herbert Clark Hoover was born in Iowa on 1874. His father, a Quaker blacksmith, influenced him to study mining engineering at the prestigious Stanford University. While spending his years at the university, he met Lou Henry- the love of his life. They eventually got married and moved to China as Hoover proceeded with his career as the head engineer for a private Chinese firm. The Boxer Rebellion signaled the start of the Hoovers’ humanitarian involvement.  When it gained momentum in 1900, his wife began working in hospitals to assist the sick and casualties of war. Herbert Hoover, on the other hand, became in charge of securing the settlement against attacks.  He built barricades and other fortifications. Hoover ...

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At 2:30 on the morning of August 3, 1923, while visiting in Vermont, Calvin Coolidge received word that he was the 30th President of the United States. By the light of a kerosene lamp, his father, who was a notary public, administered the oath of office as Coolidge placed his hand on the family Bible. Coolidge was "distinguished for character more than for heroic achievement," wrote the Democratic admirer, Alfred E. Smith. "His great task was to restore the dignity and prestige of the Presidency when it had reached the lowest ebb in our history ... in a time of extravagance and waste...." Early Years Born in Plymouth, Vermont, on July 4, 1872, Calvin Coolidge was the son of a village storekeeper. He graduated from Amherst College with honors, and entered law and politics in Northampton, Massachusetts. Slowly, methodically, he went up the political ladder from councilman in Northampton to Governor of Massachusetts, ...

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Before his nomination for the 29th American President, Warren G. Harding declared, "America's present need is not heroics, but healing; not nostrums, but normalcy; not revolution, but restoration; not agitation, but adjustment; not surgery, but serenity; not the dramatic, but the dispassionate; not experiment, but equipoise; not submergence in internationality, but sustainment in triumphant nationality..." A Democratic leader, William Gibbs McAdoo, called Harding's speeches "an army of pompous phrases moving across the landscape in search of an idea." Their very murkiness was effective, since Harding's pronouncements remained unclear on the League of Nations, in contrast to the impassioned crusade of the Democratic candidates, Governor James M. Cox of Ohio and Franklin D. Roosevelt. Thirty-one distinguished Republicans had signed a manifesto assuring voters that a vote for Harding was a vote for the League. But Harding interpreted his election as a mandate to stay out of the League of Nations. Early Years Warren Harding, born ...

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Like Roosevelt before him, Woodrow Wilson, the 28th President of the United States, regarded himself as the personal representative of the people. "No one but the President," he said, "seems to be expected ... to look out for the general interests of the country." He developed a program of progressive reform and asserted international leadership in building a new world order. In 1917 he proclaimed American entrance into World War I a crusade to make the world "safe for democracy." Early Life Wilson had seen the horrors that a war caused when he was just a child. He was born in Virginia in 1856, the son of a Presbyterian minister who was a pastor in Augusta, Georgia, during the Civil War. During the Reconstruction Era, his father became a professor in the charred city of Columbia, South Carolina. After graduation from Princeton (then the College of New Jersey) and the University of Virginia ...

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Distinguished jurist, effective administrator, but poor politician, William Howard Taft spent four uncomfortable years as the  27th President of the United States. Large, jovial, conscientious, he was caught in the intense battles between Progressives and conservatives, and got scant credit for the achievements of his administration. He is the only man who has served as both a president and later as a Chief Justice of the United States. Early Life Born in 1857, the son of a distinguished judge, William Howard Taft graduated from Yale, and then returned to Cincinnati to study and practice law. He rose in politics through Republican judiciary appointments, through his own competence and availability, and because, as he once wrote facetiously, he always had his "plate the right side up when offices were falling." Path to the White House William Howard Taft much preferred law to politics. He was appointed a Federal circuit judge at 34. His goal was ...

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With the assassination of President McKinley, Theodore Roosevelt, not quite 43, became the 26th President in the Nation's history. He was the youngest president to serve in the highest office of the government. He brought new excitement and power to the office, vigorously leading Congress and the American public toward progressive reforms and a strong foreign policy. He took the view that the President as a "steward of the people" should take whatever action necessary for the public good unless expressly forbidden by law or the Constitution." I did not usurp power," he wrote, "but I did greatly broaden the use of executive power." Early Years Theodore Roosevelt's youth was very different from that of the preceding “log cabin” Presidents. He was born in New York City in 1858 into a wealthy family, but he too struggled against poor health, and in his triumph became a supporter of the well-lived life. In 1884, his ...

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At the 1896 Republican Convention, in time of depression, the wealthy Cleveland businessman Marcus Alonzo Hanna ensured the nomination of his friend William McKinley as "the advance agent of prosperity." The Democrats, advocating the "free and unlimited coinage of both silver and gold"--which would have mildly inflated the currency--nominated William Jennings Bryan. While Hanna used large contributions from eastern Republicans frightened by Bryan's views on silver, McKinley met delegations on his front porch in Canton, Ohio. William McKinley won the office of American President by the largest majority of popular votes since 1872. Early Years Born in Niles, Ohio, in 1843, William McKinley attended Allegheny College for a short time, and then he was teaching in a country school when the Civil War broke out. Enlisting as a private in the Union Army, he was mustered out at the end of the war as a brevet major of volunteers. He decided to study ...

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