Donald Trump is aiming for a thumping victory Tuesday in Indiana to squelch lingering doubts about his viability as the Republican presidential nominee and pivot toward presumptive Democratic standard-bearer Hillary Clinton. The "stop Trump" movement faces a moment of truth in the Midwestern state, as the campaign of chief challenger Ted Cruz struggles to win over voters ahead of its potentially decisive primary. "The biggie is going to be in Indiana -- because if we win Indiana it's over with folks, it's over with. And then we focus on Hillary Clinton." According to a post by Bloomberg, Cruz actually led in prediction markets for Indiana until the New York primary on April 19, which Trump won resoundingly. Since then, the Texas senator has attempted to shake up the race by forming a short-lived pact with Ohio Governor John Kasich to divvy up the remaining major primary states (under the plan, Cruz would get Indiana), naming former HP executive Carly Fiorina as his running-mate, and ...

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Ted Cruz unveiled former business executive Carly Fiorina as his running mate on Wednesday. Cruz told a crowd of hundreds of supporters: “After a great deal of time and thought, after a great deal of consideration and prayer, I have come to the conclusion that if I am nominated, I will run on a ticket with my vice-presidential nominee Carly Fiorina.” The move comes as an attempt to shift the national conversation the day after Trump’s overwhelming win in the Republican primary in five east coast states and only six days before Indiana’s crucial primary, which awards the statewide winner 30 delegates, the largest single pot available until June. Fiorina took the stage to loud cheers and country music, telling the crowd: “Today I am very proud and very humbled and honored to announce that I have accepted Senator Ted Cruz’s offer.” The move has been seen as a desperate attempt by Ted Cruz ...

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  Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton scored sweeping victories in nominating contests in their home state of New York, and immediately cited those wins to argue that they are all but unstoppable as their respective parties' presidential nominees. Trump's crushing defeat of Ted Cruz in Tuesday's primary election tilted the energy in the Republican race back to the front-runner, just as Republican National Committee members begin meeting in Florida on Wednesday to discuss their July convention, where the nominee will be chosen. For the Democratic favorite, Clinton's more narrow victory over Bernie Sanders snapped a string of victories by the 74-year-old democratic socialist and gave her a much-needed lift with more tough fights ahead. The eventual victors of the Democratic and the Republican nominating campaigns will face each other in November's general election. Trump's win, celebrated to the tune of Frank Sinatra's "New York, New York" at Trump Tower in Manhattan, marked a ...

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Republican U.S. presidential hopeful Ted Cruz won all 14 delegates at stake on Saturday in Wyoming, besting rival Donald Trump, who made little effort to win the rural state, and further narrowing the gap in the race for the party's nomination. The crowd here was clearly in Cruz's corner, as the Texas senator was the only candidate to make the trip to Casper -- ahead of a major snowstorm -- and Sarah Palin, scheduled to speak for Trump, previously canceled. Cruz is trying to prevent Trump from obtaining the 1,237 delegates needed to secure the Republican nomination at the July convention in Cleveland. By continuing to rack up small wins, Cruz is gaining ground on the New York real estate mogul, who has thus far failed to shift his focus on the local-level campaigning necessary to win delegates. Trump has been critical of the process, again on Saturday calling it "rigged" while speaking at ...

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As Republican "establishment" rival Sen Marco Rubio fades away, U.S. Republican presidential candidate Ted Cruz has been seen as the most plausible anti- Trump candidate. This has shown in a new Reuters/Ipsos national poll, where he pulled into a statistical dead heat with front-runner Donald Trump,  with the Texas senator appeared poised to pick up a key victory in Wisconsin's primary. Cruz received 35.2 percent of support to Trump's 39.5 percent, the poll of 568 Republicans taken April 1-5 found. The numbers put the two within the poll's 4.8 percentage-point credibility interval, a measure of accuracy. Cruz and Trump were also briefly in a dead heat on March 28. The U.S. senator from Texas was running ahead of Trump in Wisconsin according to opinion polls as voters in the state went to the polls on Tuesday. Cruz hopes a win in Wisconsin would show he can unite disparate factions of the party and ...

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Photo Credit: CNN Bernie Sanders’ senior strategist floated his candidate as a potential running mate for Hillary Clinton if she wins the Democratic nomination. After Politico’s Glenn Thrush said that Clinton advocates suggested that Sanders is their key to turning out young voters in November, senior Sanders strategist Tad Devine said, “Maybe they’re going to put him on the ticket then. I don’t know what that means.” When asked if Sanders would consider being Clinton’s running made. Devine said, “I’m sure — of course, anyone would — but I don’t think there’s any plan for that, certainly no one’s talking about anything like that. He wouldn’t ever think about a decision like that unless it was done in the right and proper way.” Electing Senator Bernie Sanders makes the most practical sense as it does help Hillary Clinton win over voters under the age of old. Bernie Sanders does well with new voters, younger voters, ...

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On Saturday night, Republican Presidential hopeful Donald Trump won with 33% of the votes, well ahead of Rubio and Cruz who were virtually tied at 22%. Meanwhile, on the Democrat Camp, Hillary Clinton's strong organization and attention to local details staved off Bernie Sanders' "political revolution" in Nevada. Trump has now won the New Hampshire and South Carolina primaries against a fractured GOP field, while Sens. Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio are battling for second place while Clinton's victory that stops Sanders' momentum and puts her campaign on solid footing heading into South Carolina. This article examines Sanders' chances going into South Carolina and beyond.   Why low turnout is such a problem for Sanders's candidacy Throughout the course of his campaign, Sanders has promised to transform American government by bringing "millions and millions" of new voters to the ballot box. This is in contrast to the incrementalism of Clinton's campaign, which recognizes the confines of a bitterly divided American electorate ...

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Photo Credit: Getty Images Jeb Bush bowed out of the race for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination on Saturday night, putting to an end one of America’s most prominent political dynasties and, frankly, one of the saddest campaigns in recent memory. No single candidacy this year fell so short of its original expectations. It began with an aura of inevitability that masked deep problems, from Mr. Bush himself, a clunky candidate in a field of gifted performers, to the rightward drift of the Republican Party since Mr. Bush’s time as a consensus conservative in Florida. “I’m proud of the campaign that we’ve run to unify our country,” Mr. Bush said, his eyes moist, in an emotional speech here Saturday night after his third straight disappointing finish in the early voting states. “The people of Iowa and New Hampshire and South Carolina have spoken, and I really respect their decision.” Mr. Bush’s campaign had ...

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Photo Credit: Reuters Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump rolled to victory on Saturday in South Carolina in a contest that saw former Florida Governor Jeb Bush drop out, while Democratic hopeful Hillary Clinton beat back a strong challenge from Bernie Sanders in Nevada. The victories by Trump, who is running as an anti-establishment outsider, and Clinton, a preeminent political insider, solidified their positions as the front-runners to win their parties' respective nominations ahead of the Nov. 8 presidential election. By winning both South Carolina and New Hampshire and holding leads in 13 states that hold Republican contests on March 1, Trump was arguably on track to win the nomination, an outcome that seemed astounding to contemplate when he entered the race last summer. "It's going to be very difficult for him to be derailed at this point," said Hogan Gidley, who was a senior adviser to former Republican candidate Mike Huckabee. The 69-year-old real ...

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Photo Credit: AP Photo The Michael Bloomberg presidential mania is back again. Expressions of enthusiasm for a Michael Bloomberg presidential campaign span the gamut, from hedge-fund manager William Ackman (writing, behind a paywall, in the Financial Times) to Bloomberg’s pollster Douglas Schoen to Bloomberg himself (speaking, again behind a paywall, to the Financial Times). Which is to say, it is not a very wide gamut. When you muse too many times about running for president without following through, people treat it as a joke. That said, this is what people who want Michael Bloomberg to run for president—including, perhaps, Bloomberg himself—were waiting for: a decisive win in the New Hampshire primary by a loose cannon and an avowed socialist. If it feels to the Democratic and Republican Party establishments that events are spinning out of control, there’s a reason for that, but things could get worse in a hurry. Bloomberg is apparently ...

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