If Republican Debates were not confrontational enough, last night's CBS News debates marked a more personal mud fest between the contenders. The most important exchange of the evening came early in the night, when Donald J. Trump and Jeb Bush, a former governor of Florida, collided in an extended, personal clash over the Iraq war and President George W. Bush’s record on national security. But for all of the candidates, the debate helped illustrate the broader state of the race, and each man’s approach to the final seven days before the crucial South Carolina primary on Saturday. Jeb Bush Is Finally Going for It After stalling and sputtering in his past confrontations with Mr. Trump, Mr. Bush came into Greenville eager for a fight. He went at Mr. Trump repeatedly, assailing him as insensitive to women and minorities, and criticizing his support for using eminent domain to annex private property. In South Carolina, a ...

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Photo Credit: AP As John Kasich makes a surprise second placed finish in New Hampshire, we examine the rise of this man, and discuss if he has the momentum going into other states, where his centrist views might not be as welcome. Budget Hawk Kasich was born in the town of McKees Rocks, Pennsylvania, on May 13, 1952, the son of a mailman and a post office worker mother. After completing high school, he enrolled at Ohio State University, where he graduated in 1974. A few years later he won his first election to become the youngest-ever member of the Ohio State Senate at the age of 26. He then went on to win a seat in the US House of Representatives, where he would serve a total of nine terms from 1983 to 2001. During the 18 years he spent in Congress, Kasich earned a reputation as a budget hawk, rising up the ...

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Bernie Sanders won and won big here on Tuesday. He earned 60 percent of the vote in New Hampshire and won nearly every town and city in the state. The size and scope of his victory should give his campaign hope, but he still has work to do. It would be tempting to say that Sanders won here only because of latte-drinking liberal New Englanders, but he won across ideological groups. Sanders earned the same 60 percent from moderate and conservative voters as he did from liberal voters. If he can attract that share of moderates and conservatives in other states, he won’t hit a brick wall among whites in Appalachia or the South who tend to be more conservative than those in New Hampshire and Iowa. Sanders may not be able to win in the Deep South, where black voters are a majority, but he can be competitive if he ...

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New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, who once looked like a front-runner for the Republican presidential nomination but was hampered from the start of his campaign by a traffic scandal and a sluggish economy at home, dropped out of the race on Wednesday. His departure followed a disappointing sixth-place finish in Tuesday’s New Hampshire primary, on which he had staked his White House hopes. “I ran for president with the message that the government needs to once again work for the people, not the people work for the government,” Christie said on Facebook. “And while running for president I tried to reinforce what I have always believed – that speaking your mind matters, that experience matters, that competence matters and that it will always matter in leading our nation. That message was heard by and stood for by a lot of people, but just not enough and that’s ok.” “I have both won elections ...

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Photo Credit: Getty Images Donald J. Trump and Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont harnessed working-class fury on Tuesday to surge to commanding victories in aNew Hampshire primary that drew a huge turnout across the state. Mr. Trump, the wealthy businessman whose blunt language and outsider image have electrified many Republicans and horrified others, benefited from an unusually large field of candidates that split the vote among traditional politicians like Gov. John Kasich of Ohio, who finished second, and former Gov. Jeb Bush of Florida. But Mr. Trump also tapped into a deep well of anxiety among Republicans and independents in New Hampshire, according to exit polling data, and he ran strongest among voters who were worried about illegal immigrants, incipient economic turmoil and the threat of a terrorist attack in the United States. As polls closed, is it revealed that Mr. Trump had received 35 percent of the vote, and Mr. Sanders approached ...

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Photo Credit: ABC News The ABC debate at St. Anselm's College in New Hampshire begun with much confusion. The debate began on a bizarre note with several candidates, including Trump and Carson, apparently not hearing their introduction amid the noise of the crowd at St. Anselm's College. Both stood awkwardly in the wings as other candidates including Rubio and Bush pushed past them. Then Ohio Gov. John Kasich apparently was not introduced at all, and had to be called on stage by moderator David Muir. Things didn't get much better for Ben Carson after that. He once again was absent from the conversation for long stretches of time. In his closing statement, he told the audience: "I'm still here, and I'm not going any place either." The main storyline surrounded republican contender Marco Rubio, who came under assault from New Jersey Governor Chris Christie over his level of experience as a first-term ...

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Photo Credit: AFP / Jewel Samad Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders went head to head Thursday in their first televised duel as they fight for the Democratic White House nomination ahead of the New Hampshire primary. The 90-minute debate at the University of New Hampshire in the small college town of Durham comes three days after Clinton clinched the narrowest victory in Iowa caucus history against Sanders and five days before the country's first state primary in the election process. Sanders, the 74-year-old independent senator from neighboring Vermont, leads Clinton by 20 points in the latest New Hampshire polls with a campaign that outstripped the Clinton fundraising machine in January. While most expect Clinton to ultimately win the Democratic nomination, Sanders has taken the establishment by surprise by whipping up passionate support with a grassroots campaign focused on improving the lives of working and struggling middle class Americans. Clinton and Sanders tussled over their ...

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After a disappointing fifth-place finish in Monday’s Iowa caucuses – and a late challenge for his Senate seat – Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul announced Wednesday that he would suspend his campaign for the Republican presidential nomination. “It’s been an incredible honor to run a principled campaign for the White House,” Paul said in a statement. “Today, I will end where I began, ready and willing to fight for the cause of liberty.” Despite struggling to break 10 percent in most polls since launching his campaign last year, Paul nonetheless hoped a surge of young voters, much like the intensely loyal group who propelled his father, former Rep. Ron Paul, through several presidential bids of his own, would help carry him beyond Monday’s Iowa caucuses. His positions – from legalization of marijuana to criminal justice reform and minority outreach, seemed to be the sort of topics which would garner most youth vote. However, he ...

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As the Iowa caucuses drew to a close, it saw an upset victory for Republican Senator Ted Cruz over front-runner Donald Trump, while a virtual tie between Hillary Clinton and rival Bernie Sanders. This is very much an interesting development, as Presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders was able to catch up with Clinton in Iowa despite polls showing him at least 40 points behind some few months ago. Four in 10 caucus-goers voted for the first time, a segment that overwhelmingly favoured Sanders. More than one in four Democratic voters listed income inequality as the election’s top issue. Some Democratic caucus sites decided their winner with a coin toss. In all six situations, Clinton won. However, it has been generally agreed that Bernie Sanders has won - in terms of how far his underdog journey has taken him to, and the man himself could not hold back his excitement. “We went up against the most powerful ...

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Photo Credit: AP With just three days before Iowans head to the caucuses, new data could bring new clarity to  a number of major questions about the state of the 2016 presidential races. Barring unforeseen circumstances, Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are positioned to win in Iowa, according to a spate of new polls. In the Iowa Republican primary, the race for months has been Trump versus everyone else. While Texas Senator Ted Cruz briefly challenged the front-runner for first place in Iowa, one of the race’s earliest primaries, Trump seems to have recovered a lead well outside the margin of error, according to most of the surveys released in the past week. Trump leads Cruz, 30 percent to 23 percent, in a Monmouth University poll, 31 percent to 23 percent in a Public Policy Polling survey and 32 percent to 25 percent in the jointly-sponsored NBC News/Wall Street Journal/Marist poll, for an average lead ...

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