Photo Credit: Reuters In a meeting with President Barack Obama on Tuesday, Republican leaders from the U.S. Senate said that they would not hold hearings to consider Obama's pick for a Supreme Court vacancy, Senate Democratic leader Harry Reid told reporters. "They were willing to meet with the president. It looks like they could at least meet with the president's nominee, which should be coming very quickly," Reid said after the Oval Office meeting. In order to maintain the Republican view of the constitution, meaning upholding the belief that "a judge's task is limited — to discover what that meaning is, not to make it up," Cruz argued that judges need to practice more restraint. Problem was brewing for some time Prior to Scalia's passing, the possibility of Supreme Court vacancies was already a defining issue on the campaign trail, but in the wake of his death candidates have fought over whether Obama should ...

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On Saturday night, Republican Presidential hopeful Donald Trump won with 33% of the votes, well ahead of Rubio and Cruz who were virtually tied at 22%. Meanwhile, on the Democrat Camp, Hillary Clinton's strong organization and attention to local details staved off Bernie Sanders' "political revolution" in Nevada. Trump has now won the New Hampshire and South Carolina primaries against a fractured GOP field, while Sens. Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio are battling for second place while Clinton's victory that stops Sanders' momentum and puts her campaign on solid footing heading into South Carolina. This article examines Sanders' chances going into South Carolina and beyond.   Why low turnout is such a problem for Sanders's candidacy Throughout the course of his campaign, Sanders has promised to transform American government by bringing "millions and millions" of new voters to the ballot box. This is in contrast to the incrementalism of Clinton's campaign, which recognizes the confines of a bitterly divided American electorate ...

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Photo Credit: Reuters Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump rolled to victory on Saturday in South Carolina in a contest that saw former Florida Governor Jeb Bush drop out, while Democratic hopeful Hillary Clinton beat back a strong challenge from Bernie Sanders in Nevada. The victories by Trump, who is running as an anti-establishment outsider, and Clinton, a preeminent political insider, solidified their positions as the front-runners to win their parties' respective nominations ahead of the Nov. 8 presidential election. By winning both South Carolina and New Hampshire and holding leads in 13 states that hold Republican contests on March 1, Trump was arguably on track to win the nomination, an outcome that seemed astounding to contemplate when he entered the race last summer. "It's going to be very difficult for him to be derailed at this point," said Hogan Gidley, who was a senior adviser to former Republican candidate Mike Huckabee. The 69-year-old real ...

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Photo Credit: Getty South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley, viewed as a possible Republican vice presidential candidate, endorsed U.S. Senator Marco Rubio on Wednesday for their party's 2016 White House nomination, three days before the state's presidential primary. "If we elect Marco Rubio, every day will be a great day in America," Haley said with Rubio at her side at an event in Chapin, South Carolina. Haley's endorsement gave Rubio, 44, a valuable ally to try to sway voters in South Carolina, the third contest after Iowa and New Hampshire to pick a party nominee for the Nov. 8 presidential election to succeed Democratic President Barack Obama. Rubio is seeking to take second or third place in South Carolina's Republican primary on Saturday and potentially emerge as the main Republican establishment alternative to front-runner Donald Trump, who has a big lead in the state. "I can't tell you how honored I am to get the ...

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Photo Credit: Getty Images Democratic presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders is in a dead heat with rival Hillary Clinton just days beforethe party's Nevada caucuses this weekend, according to a new CNN/ORC poll. Clinton leads in the state, with 48 percent support, followed closely by Sanders, with 47 percent support. The former first lady led in the poll by 16 points in October, besting Sanders by a 50 percent to 34 percent margin. The economy is rated the top issue by 42 percent of Nevada Democrats, and among that group, 52 percent back Sanders, versus 43 percent for Clinton. Clinton is seen by 48 percent of respondents as the best candidate to handle the economy, compared to 47 percent for the Vermont senator. But when asked who would do the most to help the middle class, 50 percent said Sanders, compared to 47 percent for Clinton. On foreign policy, the former secretary of State is the clear ...

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Photo Credit: AP Photo The Michael Bloomberg presidential mania is back again. Expressions of enthusiasm for a Michael Bloomberg presidential campaign span the gamut, from hedge-fund manager William Ackman (writing, behind a paywall, in the Financial Times) to Bloomberg’s pollster Douglas Schoen to Bloomberg himself (speaking, again behind a paywall, to the Financial Times). Which is to say, it is not a very wide gamut. When you muse too many times about running for president without following through, people treat it as a joke. That said, this is what people who want Michael Bloomberg to run for president—including, perhaps, Bloomberg himself—were waiting for: a decisive win in the New Hampshire primary by a loose cannon and an avowed socialist. If it feels to the Democratic and Republican Party establishments that events are spinning out of control, there’s a reason for that, but things could get worse in a hurry. Bloomberg is apparently ...

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 If Republican Debates were not confrontational enough, last night's CBS News debates marked a more personal mud fest between the contenders. The most important exchange of the evening came early in the night, when Donald J. Trump and Jeb Bush, a former governor of Florida, collided in an extended, personal clash over the Iraq war and President George W. Bush’s record on national security. But for all of the candidates, the debate helped illustrate the broader state of the race, and each man’s approach to the final seven days before the crucial South Carolina primary on Saturday. Jeb Bush Is Finally Going for It After stalling and sputtering in his past confrontations with Mr. Trump, Mr. Bush came into Greenville eager for a fight. He went at Mr. Trump repeatedly, assailing him as insensitive to women and minorities, and criticizing his support for using eminent domain to annex private property. In South Carolina, a ...

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Photo Credit: AP As John Kasich makes a surprise second placed finish in New Hampshire, we examine the rise of this man, and discuss if he has the momentum going into other states, where his centrist views might not be as welcome. Budget Hawk Kasich was born in the town of McKees Rocks, Pennsylvania, on May 13, 1952, the son of a mailman and a post office worker mother. After completing high school, he enrolled at Ohio State University, where he graduated in 1974. A few years later he won his first election to become the youngest-ever member of the Ohio State Senate at the age of 26. He then went on to win a seat in the US House of Representatives, where he would serve a total of nine terms from 1983 to 2001. During the 18 years he spent in Congress, Kasich earned a reputation as a budget hawk, rising up the ...

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Bernie Sanders won and won big here on Tuesday. He earned 60 percent of the vote in New Hampshire and won nearly every town and city in the state. The size and scope of his victory should give his campaign hope, but he still has work to do. It would be tempting to say that Sanders won here only because of latte-drinking liberal New Englanders, but he won across ideological groups. Sanders earned the same 60 percent from moderate and conservative voters as he did from liberal voters. If he can attract that share of moderates and conservatives in other states, he won’t hit a brick wall among whites in Appalachia or the South who tend to be more conservative than those in New Hampshire and Iowa. Sanders may not be able to win in the Deep South, where black voters are a majority, but he can be competitive if he ...

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Photo Credit: Getty Images Donald J. Trump and Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont harnessed working-class fury on Tuesday to surge to commanding victories in aNew Hampshire primary that drew a huge turnout across the state. Mr. Trump, the wealthy businessman whose blunt language and outsider image have electrified many Republicans and horrified others, benefited from an unusually large field of candidates that split the vote among traditional politicians like Gov. John Kasich of Ohio, who finished second, and former Gov. Jeb Bush of Florida. But Mr. Trump also tapped into a deep well of anxiety among Republicans and independents in New Hampshire, according to exit polling data, and he ran strongest among voters who were worried about illegal immigrants, incipient economic turmoil and the threat of a terrorist attack in the United States. As polls closed, is it revealed that Mr. Trump had received 35 percent of the vote, and Mr. Sanders approached ...

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