Donald Trump is aiming for a thumping victory Tuesday in Indiana to squelch lingering doubts about his viability as the Republican presidential nominee and pivot toward presumptive Democratic standard-bearer Hillary Clinton. The "stop Trump" movement faces a moment of truth in the Midwestern state, as the campaign of chief challenger Ted Cruz struggles to win over voters ahead of its potentially decisive primary. "The biggie is going to be in Indiana -- because if we win Indiana it's over with folks, it's over with. And then we focus on Hillary Clinton." According to a post by Bloomberg, Cruz actually led in prediction markets for Indiana until the New York primary on April 19, which Trump won resoundingly. Since then, the Texas senator has attempted to shake up the race by forming a short-lived pact with Ohio Governor John Kasich to divvy up the remaining major primary states (under the plan, Cruz would get Indiana), naming former HP executive Carly Fiorina as his running-mate, and ...

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After weeks of bitter negotiations, Democratic presidential rivals Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders will face off in a debate on April 14 in Brooklyn, after sparring for days about having a New York debate ahead of the state primary. The duo accepted CNN’s offer to hold the debate in the run-up to the April 19 primary, the network said Monday. The announcement ended days of acrimonious negotiations, with both sides accusing each other of playing games with the proposed forum. Sanders’s campaign said it agreed to move a major New York City rally scheduled for April 14 to the night before so Sanders could attend the debate. Trailing in the race for the Democratic nomination for the White House, Sanders has been pushing for a debate in New York, where he lags in opinion polls. “We are glad that she finally has agreed,” said Michael Briggs, Sanders’s spokesman. “Sanders all along has pressed for a debate ...

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 If Republican Debates were not confrontational enough, last night's CBS News debates marked a more personal mud fest between the contenders. The most important exchange of the evening came early in the night, when Donald J. Trump and Jeb Bush, a former governor of Florida, collided in an extended, personal clash over the Iraq war and President George W. Bush’s record on national security. But for all of the candidates, the debate helped illustrate the broader state of the race, and each man’s approach to the final seven days before the crucial South Carolina primary on Saturday. Jeb Bush Is Finally Going for It After stalling and sputtering in his past confrontations with Mr. Trump, Mr. Bush came into Greenville eager for a fight. He went at Mr. Trump repeatedly, assailing him as insensitive to women and minorities, and criticizing his support for using eminent domain to annex private property. In South Carolina, a ...

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U.S. President Barack Obama’s immigration action is put on hold due to the block from a Texas District Justice in February, which came before many of the affected immigrants were to start applying for the new immigration program. Officials from the White House are now informing that the President will not take immediate action regarding this issue due to the confusion caused. This development comes after the Federal Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals denied the request form the Justice Department to give President Barack Obama’s right to exercise his executive powers on his proposal of immigration actions. Back in November 2014, President Barack Obama made a speech about undocumented immigrants and proposed an action to ease the deportation of such immigrants. The programs that were proposed for implementation are the Deferred Action for Parents of Americans (DAPA) and Lawful Permanent Residents and the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), the program for teens who are ...

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With the term of President Barack Obama coming to an end, the United States is only weeks away from the first primary election debates.  In this post, we look at the various potential candidates that would be running for their respective nominations for the Blue or Red half in 2016. Mike Huckabee In his second tilt at the Republican nomination, Huckabee plans to use harness the frustrations of blue-collar workers in order to capture the White House. It’s unlikely however, that the former Arkansas Governor will be able to count on the same strong support amongst social conservatives that he commanded in 2008. He also faces strong challenges from small government advocates, who point to tax increases whilst he was governor. Huckabee has always resonated with voters, many of whom are attracted by his down-to-earth attitude and principled conservatism but taking a break from politics during the 2012 presidential race may prove to ...

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Before his nomination for the 29th American President, Warren G. Harding declared, "America's present need is not heroics, but healing; not nostrums, but normalcy; not revolution, but restoration; not agitation, but adjustment; not surgery, but serenity; not the dramatic, but the dispassionate; not experiment, but equipoise; not submergence in internationality, but sustainment in triumphant nationality..." A Democratic leader, William Gibbs McAdoo, called Harding's speeches "an army of pompous phrases moving across the landscape in search of an idea." Their very murkiness was effective, since Harding's pronouncements remained unclear on the League of Nations, in contrast to the impassioned crusade of the Democratic candidates, Governor James M. Cox of Ohio and Franklin D. Roosevelt. Thirty-one distinguished Republicans had signed a manifesto assuring voters that a vote for Harding was a vote for the League. But Harding interpreted his election as a mandate to stay out of the League of Nations. Early Years Warren Harding, born ...

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At the 1896 Republican Convention, in time of depression, the wealthy Cleveland businessman Marcus Alonzo Hanna ensured the nomination of his friend William McKinley as "the advance agent of prosperity." The Democrats, advocating the "free and unlimited coinage of both silver and gold"--which would have mildly inflated the currency--nominated William Jennings Bryan. While Hanna used large contributions from eastern Republicans frightened by Bryan's views on silver, McKinley met delegations on his front porch in Canton, Ohio. William McKinley won the office of American President by the largest majority of popular votes since 1872. Early Years Born in Niles, Ohio, in 1843, William McKinley attended Allegheny College for a short time, and then he was teaching in a country school when the Civil War broke out. Enlisting as a private in the Union Army, he was mustered out at the end of the war as a brevet major of volunteers. He decided to study ...

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Gen. Ulysses S. Grant quarreled with President Andrew Johnson and aligned himself with the Radical Republicans. He was, as the symbol of Union victory during the Civil War, their logical candidate for the18th President of the United States in 1868. The American people who were responsible for electing him hoped for an end to the turmoil caused by the Civil War and Reconstruction. However, Grant provided them with neither vigor nor reform. Looking to Congress for direction, he seemed overwhelmed. One visitor to the White House made the remark that Grant was "a puzzled pathos, as of a man with a problem before him of which he does not understand the terms." Early Years Born in 1822, Ulysses Grant was the son of an Ohio tanner. He went to West Point against his will, and he graduated in the middle of his class. He went on to fight in the Mexican War under ...

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Andrew Johnson unexpectedly became the 17th American President after Abraham Lincoln’s assassination. He was responsible for many of the policies adopted for the Reconstruction period after the Civil War. Many historians consider him one of the worst presidents, after James Buchanon, because he favored Southern whites and hindered the nation’s healing process. Early Life Andrew Johnson was born in December, 1808 in Raleigh, North Carolina. His father was a constable and his mother worked as a laundress. Johnson was three years old when family faced even harder financial burdens because of his father untimely death. There were even rumors that Andrew was fathered by another man because he did not resemble his siblings. Andrew was apprenticed to a tailor when he was ten years old. The contract specified that he remain until the age of twenty-one, but he ran away after five years. He was provided a rudimentary education in reading while he was ...

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James Buchanan, Jr. was the 15th American President and served immediately before the American Civil War. He is, to date, the only president from Pennsylvania and the only president to remain a lifelong bachelor. When he left office, his popularity had suffered, and the Democratic Party had split. Early Years James Buchanan was born on April 23, 1791, in Cove Gap, Pennsylvania, to James Buchanan Sr., a merchant who had emigrated from Ireland, and Elizabeth Speer Buchanan. The young Buchanan graduated from Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, and then studied law. Following his acceptance to the bar in 1812, he opened a successful legal practice in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. As a member of the Federalist Party, Buchanan began his political career by serving in the Pennsylvania legislature from 1814 to 1816. In 1820, he was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives, where he remained for the next decade. In Congress, Buchanan aligned himself ...

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