Donald Trump is aiming for a thumping victory Tuesday in Indiana to squelch lingering doubts about his viability as the Republican presidential nominee and pivot toward presumptive Democratic standard-bearer Hillary Clinton. The "stop Trump" movement faces a moment of truth in the Midwestern state, as the campaign of chief challenger Ted Cruz struggles to win over voters ahead of its potentially decisive primary. "The biggie is going to be in Indiana -- because if we win Indiana it's over with folks, it's over with. And then we focus on Hillary Clinton." According to a post by Bloomberg, Cruz actually led in prediction markets for Indiana until the New York primary on April 19, which Trump won resoundingly. Since then, the Texas senator has attempted to shake up the race by forming a short-lived pact with Ohio Governor John Kasich to divvy up the remaining major primary states (under the plan, Cruz would get Indiana), naming former HP executive Carly Fiorina as his running-mate, and ...

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Ted Cruz unveiled former business executive Carly Fiorina as his running mate on Wednesday. Cruz told a crowd of hundreds of supporters: “After a great deal of time and thought, after a great deal of consideration and prayer, I have come to the conclusion that if I am nominated, I will run on a ticket with my vice-presidential nominee Carly Fiorina.” The move comes as an attempt to shift the national conversation the day after Trump’s overwhelming win in the Republican primary in five east coast states and only six days before Indiana’s crucial primary, which awards the statewide winner 30 delegates, the largest single pot available until June. Fiorina took the stage to loud cheers and country music, telling the crowd: “Today I am very proud and very humbled and honored to announce that I have accepted Senator Ted Cruz’s offer.” The move has been seen as a desperate attempt by Ted Cruz ...

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  Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton scored sweeping victories in nominating contests in their home state of New York, and immediately cited those wins to argue that they are all but unstoppable as their respective parties' presidential nominees. Trump's crushing defeat of Ted Cruz in Tuesday's primary election tilted the energy in the Republican race back to the front-runner, just as Republican National Committee members begin meeting in Florida on Wednesday to discuss their July convention, where the nominee will be chosen. For the Democratic favorite, Clinton's more narrow victory over Bernie Sanders snapped a string of victories by the 74-year-old democratic socialist and gave her a much-needed lift with more tough fights ahead. The eventual victors of the Democratic and the Republican nominating campaigns will face each other in November's general election. Trump's win, celebrated to the tune of Frank Sinatra's "New York, New York" at Trump Tower in Manhattan, marked a ...

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Republican U.S. presidential hopeful Ted Cruz won all 14 delegates at stake on Saturday in Wyoming, besting rival Donald Trump, who made little effort to win the rural state, and further narrowing the gap in the race for the party's nomination. The crowd here was clearly in Cruz's corner, as the Texas senator was the only candidate to make the trip to Casper -- ahead of a major snowstorm -- and Sarah Palin, scheduled to speak for Trump, previously canceled. Cruz is trying to prevent Trump from obtaining the 1,237 delegates needed to secure the Republican nomination at the July convention in Cleveland. By continuing to rack up small wins, Cruz is gaining ground on the New York real estate mogul, who has thus far failed to shift his focus on the local-level campaigning necessary to win delegates. Trump has been critical of the process, again on Saturday calling it "rigged" while speaking at ...

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Photo credit: Reuters/Dominick Reuter Donald Trump proposed on Tuesday forcing Mexico to pay for his planned border wall by threatening to block remittances from illegal immigrants, which he said amounts to "welfare" for poor families in Mexico that their government does not provide. The Republican presidential candidate's campaign said in a memo that if elected in November, Trump would use a U.S. anti-terrorism law to cut off such money transfers unless Mexico made a one-time payment of $5 billion to $10 billion for the wall. Trump's pledge to build the wall has been a much-touted highlight of a platform targeting illegal immigration in the United States that has helped make him the front-runner to be the Republican nominee for the Nov. 8 election. The memo elaborated on an idea Trump floated in August, when he suggested seizing all remittances tied to "illegal wages." It said that upon taking office a Trump administration would ...

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Donald Trump’s speech to America’s largest pro-Israel lobby did not help his standing among Israelis, a new poll shows. The March Peace Index, a monthly poll of Israeli attitudes by the Israel Democracy Institute think tank, showed that 40 percent of Israeli Jews thought Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton would be “better for Israel,” versus 30 percent for Trump, the Republican front-runner. In addition, 43 percent of Israeli Jews feel Clinton would better serve American interests, as opposed to 24 percent for Trump. The poll was taken from March 28 to 30, about a week after Trump addressed the national conference of AIPAC. His speech, which struck traditional pro-Israel notes, drew an enthusiastic response from the crowd amid scattered protests. Previously, Trump had said he would be “neutral” on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Israelis also favored Clinton over Trump before the AIPAC conference. A survey in early March by the Israeli news website Walla found that Israelis preferred ...

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On Saturday night, Republican Presidential hopeful Donald Trump won with 33% of the votes, well ahead of Rubio and Cruz who were virtually tied at 22%. Meanwhile, on the Democrat Camp, Hillary Clinton's strong organization and attention to local details staved off Bernie Sanders' "political revolution" in Nevada. Trump has now won the New Hampshire and South Carolina primaries against a fractured GOP field, while Sens. Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio are battling for second place while Clinton's victory that stops Sanders' momentum and puts her campaign on solid footing heading into South Carolina. This article examines Sanders' chances going into South Carolina and beyond.   Why low turnout is such a problem for Sanders's candidacy Throughout the course of his campaign, Sanders has promised to transform American government by bringing "millions and millions" of new voters to the ballot box. This is in contrast to the incrementalism of Clinton's campaign, which recognizes the confines of a bitterly divided American electorate ...

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Photo Credit: Getty Images Democratic presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders is in a dead heat with rival Hillary Clinton just days beforethe party's Nevada caucuses this weekend, according to a new CNN/ORC poll. Clinton leads in the state, with 48 percent support, followed closely by Sanders, with 47 percent support. The former first lady led in the poll by 16 points in October, besting Sanders by a 50 percent to 34 percent margin. The economy is rated the top issue by 42 percent of Nevada Democrats, and among that group, 52 percent back Sanders, versus 43 percent for Clinton. Clinton is seen by 48 percent of respondents as the best candidate to handle the economy, compared to 47 percent for the Vermont senator. But when asked who would do the most to help the middle class, 50 percent said Sanders, compared to 47 percent for Clinton. On foreign policy, the former secretary of State is the clear ...

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Bernie Sanders won and won big here on Tuesday. He earned 60 percent of the vote in New Hampshire and won nearly every town and city in the state. The size and scope of his victory should give his campaign hope, but he still has work to do. It would be tempting to say that Sanders won here only because of latte-drinking liberal New Englanders, but he won across ideological groups. Sanders earned the same 60 percent from moderate and conservative voters as he did from liberal voters. If he can attract that share of moderates and conservatives in other states, he won’t hit a brick wall among whites in Appalachia or the South who tend to be more conservative than those in New Hampshire and Iowa. Sanders may not be able to win in the Deep South, where black voters are a majority, but he can be competitive if he ...

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Photo Credit: Getty Images Donald J. Trump and Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont harnessed working-class fury on Tuesday to surge to commanding victories in aNew Hampshire primary that drew a huge turnout across the state. Mr. Trump, the wealthy businessman whose blunt language and outsider image have electrified many Republicans and horrified others, benefited from an unusually large field of candidates that split the vote among traditional politicians like Gov. John Kasich of Ohio, who finished second, and former Gov. Jeb Bush of Florida. But Mr. Trump also tapped into a deep well of anxiety among Republicans and independents in New Hampshire, according to exit polling data, and he ran strongest among voters who were worried about illegal immigrants, incipient economic turmoil and the threat of a terrorist attack in the United States. As polls closed, is it revealed that Mr. Trump had received 35 percent of the vote, and Mr. Sanders approached ...

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