Photo Credit: Getty Images Jeb Bush bowed out of the race for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination on Saturday night, putting to an end one of America’s most prominent political dynasties and, frankly, one of the saddest campaigns in recent memory. No single candidacy this year fell so short of its original expectations. It began with an aura of inevitability that masked deep problems, from Mr. Bush himself, a clunky candidate in a field of gifted performers, to the rightward drift of the Republican Party since Mr. Bush’s time as a consensus conservative in Florida. “I’m proud of the campaign that we’ve run to unify our country,” Mr. Bush said, his eyes moist, in an emotional speech here Saturday night after his third straight disappointing finish in the early voting states. “The people of Iowa and New Hampshire and South Carolina have spoken, and I really respect their decision.” Mr. Bush’s campaign had ...

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Photo Credit: Reuters Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump rolled to victory on Saturday in South Carolina in a contest that saw former Florida Governor Jeb Bush drop out, while Democratic hopeful Hillary Clinton beat back a strong challenge from Bernie Sanders in Nevada. The victories by Trump, who is running as an anti-establishment outsider, and Clinton, a preeminent political insider, solidified their positions as the front-runners to win their parties' respective nominations ahead of the Nov. 8 presidential election. By winning both South Carolina and New Hampshire and holding leads in 13 states that hold Republican contests on March 1, Trump was arguably on track to win the nomination, an outcome that seemed astounding to contemplate when he entered the race last summer. "It's going to be very difficult for him to be derailed at this point," said Hogan Gidley, who was a senior adviser to former Republican candidate Mike Huckabee. The 69-year-old real ...

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Photo Credit: Getty South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley, viewed as a possible Republican vice presidential candidate, endorsed U.S. Senator Marco Rubio on Wednesday for their party's 2016 White House nomination, three days before the state's presidential primary. "If we elect Marco Rubio, every day will be a great day in America," Haley said with Rubio at her side at an event in Chapin, South Carolina. Haley's endorsement gave Rubio, 44, a valuable ally to try to sway voters in South Carolina, the third contest after Iowa and New Hampshire to pick a party nominee for the Nov. 8 presidential election to succeed Democratic President Barack Obama. Rubio is seeking to take second or third place in South Carolina's Republican primary on Saturday and potentially emerge as the main Republican establishment alternative to front-runner Donald Trump, who has a big lead in the state. "I can't tell you how honored I am to get the ...

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 If Republican Debates were not confrontational enough, last night's CBS News debates marked a more personal mud fest between the contenders. The most important exchange of the evening came early in the night, when Donald J. Trump and Jeb Bush, a former governor of Florida, collided in an extended, personal clash over the Iraq war and President George W. Bush’s record on national security. But for all of the candidates, the debate helped illustrate the broader state of the race, and each man’s approach to the final seven days before the crucial South Carolina primary on Saturday. Jeb Bush Is Finally Going for It After stalling and sputtering in his past confrontations with Mr. Trump, Mr. Bush came into Greenville eager for a fight. He went at Mr. Trump repeatedly, assailing him as insensitive to women and minorities, and criticizing his support for using eminent domain to annex private property. In South Carolina, a ...

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Bernie Sanders won and won big here on Tuesday. He earned 60 percent of the vote in New Hampshire and won nearly every town and city in the state. The size and scope of his victory should give his campaign hope, but he still has work to do. It would be tempting to say that Sanders won here only because of latte-drinking liberal New Englanders, but he won across ideological groups. Sanders earned the same 60 percent from moderate and conservative voters as he did from liberal voters. If he can attract that share of moderates and conservatives in other states, he won’t hit a brick wall among whites in Appalachia or the South who tend to be more conservative than those in New Hampshire and Iowa. Sanders may not be able to win in the Deep South, where black voters are a majority, but he can be competitive if he ...

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Photo Credit: Getty Images Donald J. Trump and Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont harnessed working-class fury on Tuesday to surge to commanding victories in aNew Hampshire primary that drew a huge turnout across the state. Mr. Trump, the wealthy businessman whose blunt language and outsider image have electrified many Republicans and horrified others, benefited from an unusually large field of candidates that split the vote among traditional politicians like Gov. John Kasich of Ohio, who finished second, and former Gov. Jeb Bush of Florida. But Mr. Trump also tapped into a deep well of anxiety among Republicans and independents in New Hampshire, according to exit polling data, and he ran strongest among voters who were worried about illegal immigrants, incipient economic turmoil and the threat of a terrorist attack in the United States. As polls closed, is it revealed that Mr. Trump had received 35 percent of the vote, and Mr. Sanders approached ...

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Photo Credit: ABC News The ABC debate at St. Anselm's College in New Hampshire begun with much confusion. The debate began on a bizarre note with several candidates, including Trump and Carson, apparently not hearing their introduction amid the noise of the crowd at St. Anselm's College. Both stood awkwardly in the wings as other candidates including Rubio and Bush pushed past them. Then Ohio Gov. John Kasich apparently was not introduced at all, and had to be called on stage by moderator David Muir. Things didn't get much better for Ben Carson after that. He once again was absent from the conversation for long stretches of time. In his closing statement, he told the audience: "I'm still here, and I'm not going any place either." The main storyline surrounded republican contender Marco Rubio, who came under assault from New Jersey Governor Chris Christie over his level of experience as a first-term ...

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Photo Credit: AP With just three days before Iowans head to the caucuses, new data could bring new clarity to  a number of major questions about the state of the 2016 presidential races. Barring unforeseen circumstances, Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are positioned to win in Iowa, according to a spate of new polls. In the Iowa Republican primary, the race for months has been Trump versus everyone else. While Texas Senator Ted Cruz briefly challenged the front-runner for first place in Iowa, one of the race’s earliest primaries, Trump seems to have recovered a lead well outside the margin of error, according to most of the surveys released in the past week. Trump leads Cruz, 30 percent to 23 percent, in a Monmouth University poll, 31 percent to 23 percent in a Public Policy Polling survey and 32 percent to 25 percent in the jointly-sponsored NBC News/Wall Street Journal/Marist poll, for an average lead ...

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Photo Credit: Reuters Sarah Palin endorsed Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump at a rally in Ames, Iowa, on Tuesday night, near John Wayne stadium. Trump is holding onto his lead in Iowa where the caucuses are less than two weeks away. In a report by the Washington Post, Palin’s endorsement is a much-needed boost for Trump’s campaign in the state, as it saw a surge of Republican caucus-goers supporting Sen. Ted Cruz. In the past two and a half months, support for Cruz has gone up in various national polls, which pushed him into second place among the Republican presidential candidates. In fact, his popularity almost led to a tie between him and Trump in Iowa. And it is this threat posed by Cruz in Iowa that has perhaps lead to the reignition of the "birthier issue", and now Palin's endorsement would come as a shot in the arm that could help Trump ...

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Photo Credit: Reuters Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump has vowed to force Apple Inc. - America's most profitable manufacturer - to keep its production lines inside U.S. borders. The billionaire businessman used a speech at Liberty University on Monday to unveil his plan, which was skimpy on specifics about how he could force a private business to change its production strategies. But the real estate mogul did propose a 35 percent tax on businesses who produce their goods overseas despite claiming to support free trade, and having made his personal fortune as a free-market capitalist. Most of his wealth has been built as a developer through his real estate firm. 'We’re going to get Apple to build their damn computers and things in this country instead of other countries,' Trump said near the end of his speech, according to a report in the technology blog Gizmodo. The report noted that Apple already builds its Mac Pro ...

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