Donald Trump is aiming for a thumping victory Tuesday in Indiana to squelch lingering doubts about his viability as the Republican presidential nominee and pivot toward presumptive Democratic standard-bearer Hillary Clinton. The "stop Trump" movement faces a moment of truth in the Midwestern state, as the campaign of chief challenger Ted Cruz struggles to win over voters ahead of its potentially decisive primary. "The biggie is going to be in Indiana -- because if we win Indiana it's over with folks, it's over with. And then we focus on Hillary Clinton." According to a post by Bloomberg, Cruz actually led in prediction markets for Indiana until the New York primary on April 19, which Trump won resoundingly. Since then, the Texas senator has attempted to shake up the race by forming a short-lived pact with Ohio Governor John Kasich to divvy up the remaining major primary states (under the plan, Cruz would get Indiana), naming former HP executive Carly Fiorina as his running-mate, and ...

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Ted Cruz unveiled former business executive Carly Fiorina as his running mate on Wednesday. Cruz told a crowd of hundreds of supporters: “After a great deal of time and thought, after a great deal of consideration and prayer, I have come to the conclusion that if I am nominated, I will run on a ticket with my vice-presidential nominee Carly Fiorina.” The move comes as an attempt to shift the national conversation the day after Trump’s overwhelming win in the Republican primary in five east coast states and only six days before Indiana’s crucial primary, which awards the statewide winner 30 delegates, the largest single pot available until June. Fiorina took the stage to loud cheers and country music, telling the crowd: “Today I am very proud and very humbled and honored to announce that I have accepted Senator Ted Cruz’s offer.” The move has been seen as a desperate attempt by Ted Cruz ...

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  Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton scored sweeping victories in nominating contests in their home state of New York, and immediately cited those wins to argue that they are all but unstoppable as their respective parties' presidential nominees. Trump's crushing defeat of Ted Cruz in Tuesday's primary election tilted the energy in the Republican race back to the front-runner, just as Republican National Committee members begin meeting in Florida on Wednesday to discuss their July convention, where the nominee will be chosen. For the Democratic favorite, Clinton's more narrow victory over Bernie Sanders snapped a string of victories by the 74-year-old democratic socialist and gave her a much-needed lift with more tough fights ahead. The eventual victors of the Democratic and the Republican nominating campaigns will face each other in November's general election. Trump's win, celebrated to the tune of Frank Sinatra's "New York, New York" at Trump Tower in Manhattan, marked a ...

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After weeks of bitter negotiations, Democratic presidential rivals Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders will face off in a debate on April 14 in Brooklyn, after sparring for days about having a New York debate ahead of the state primary. The duo accepted CNN’s offer to hold the debate in the run-up to the April 19 primary, the network said Monday. The announcement ended days of acrimonious negotiations, with both sides accusing each other of playing games with the proposed forum. Sanders’s campaign said it agreed to move a major New York City rally scheduled for April 14 to the night before so Sanders could attend the debate. Trailing in the race for the Democratic nomination for the White House, Sanders has been pushing for a debate in New York, where he lags in opinion polls. “We are glad that she finally has agreed,” said Michael Briggs, Sanders’s spokesman. “Sanders all along has pressed for a debate ...

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Photo Credit: Reuters After reports from President Barack Obama's interview, which seemed to back current Democratic Hillary Clinton as the likely nominee, Vermont Senator and Hilary's closest rival Senator Bernie Sanders said on Thursday it was "absurd" to suggest he drop out of the race. Obama privately told a group of Democratic donors last Friday that Sanders was nearing the point at which his campaign against Clinton would end, and that the party must soon come together to back her, the New York Times reported. "The bottom line is that when only half of the American people have participated in the political process ... I think it is absurd for anybody to suggest that those people not have a right to cast a vote," Sanders told MSNBC in an interview. The White House on Thursday said Obama did not indicate which candidate he preferred in his remarks to the donors. Clinton, a former secretary of ...

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Photo Credit: Getty Images Donald J. Trump and Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont harnessed working-class fury on Tuesday to surge to commanding victories in aNew Hampshire primary that drew a huge turnout across the state. Mr. Trump, the wealthy businessman whose blunt language and outsider image have electrified many Republicans and horrified others, benefited from an unusually large field of candidates that split the vote among traditional politicians like Gov. John Kasich of Ohio, who finished second, and former Gov. Jeb Bush of Florida. But Mr. Trump also tapped into a deep well of anxiety among Republicans and independents in New Hampshire, according to exit polling data, and he ran strongest among voters who were worried about illegal immigrants, incipient economic turmoil and the threat of a terrorist attack in the United States. As polls closed, is it revealed that Mr. Trump had received 35 percent of the vote, and Mr. Sanders approached ...

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As the Iowa caucuses drew to a close, it saw an upset victory for Republican Senator Ted Cruz over front-runner Donald Trump, while a virtual tie between Hillary Clinton and rival Bernie Sanders. This is very much an interesting development, as Presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders was able to catch up with Clinton in Iowa despite polls showing him at least 40 points behind some few months ago. Four in 10 caucus-goers voted for the first time, a segment that overwhelmingly favoured Sanders. More than one in four Democratic voters listed income inequality as the election’s top issue. Some Democratic caucus sites decided their winner with a coin toss. In all six situations, Clinton won. However, it has been generally agreed that Bernie Sanders has won - in terms of how far his underdog journey has taken him to, and the man himself could not hold back his excitement. “We went up against the most powerful ...

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Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders on Monday drew their sharpest contrasts yet in hard-hitting final pitches to Iowa voters as the competitive race to win the first in the nation caucuses enters its last week, with solid passionate pleas for supporters to caucus on February 1. Sanders offered a vigorous performance punctuated by calls for a progressive revolution. Clinton matched him for energy by arguing that only she had been on the front lines of progressive change for decades and uniquely had the multi-tasking skills at home and abroad needed of a President. "It's hard," she said. "If it were easy, hey, there wouldn't be any contest. But it's not easy. There are very different visions, different values, different forces at work, and you have to have somebody who is a proven fighter -- somebody who has taken them on and won, and kept going, and will do that as President." Sanders, going ...

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Photo Credits: Huffington Post As Democrat Presidential forerunner Hilary Clinton slips behind polls in Iowa against fellow Democratic Socialist candidate Sen Bernie Sanders, the Clinton camp has launched an attack on her rival on one issue that has been fiercely discussed of late - gun control. During Barack Obama’s final State of the Union speech on Tuesday night, Hillary Clinton released an ad, titled I’m with Him, in which she aligned herself with the president on gun control. “It’s time to pick a side,” the Democratic candidate said in the ad, which aired on Wednesday in Iowa and New Hampshire, states which will vote next month in the first caucuses and primaries of 2016. “Either we stand with the gun lobby or we join the president and stand up to them. I’m with him.” While Clinton still maintains a lead over Sanders in national polls, the once overwhelming favourite for the nomination is ...

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Photo credit: Reuters U.S. President Barack Obama will not publicly endorse a candidate before the 2016 Democratic primary election, White House Chief of Staff Denis McDonough said on Sunday. His statement comes from NBC's "Meet the Press" interview, where he states that the President and his team would "do exactly what has been done in the past," He said Obama will be "out there" campaigning after the primary election to help support the Democratic candidate. During the course of the show, McDonough also responded to questions about whether Obama's op-ed in the New York Times about gun control was an attempt to call out Democratic candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, who has waffled on the gun issue over the years. The New York Times article that President Obama had written had stated that he will only campaign for candidates who support gun reform. "This isn't only about the primary," McDonough said. "We've got a ...

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