Photo Credit: Getty Images Jeb Bush bowed out of the race for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination on Saturday night, putting to an end one of America’s most prominent political dynasties and, frankly, one of the saddest campaigns in recent memory. No single candidacy this year fell so short of its original expectations. It began with an aura of inevitability that masked deep problems, from Mr. Bush himself, a clunky candidate in a field of gifted performers, to the rightward drift of the Republican Party since Mr. Bush’s time as a consensus conservative in Florida. “I’m proud of the campaign that we’ve run to unify our country,” Mr. Bush said, his eyes moist, in an emotional speech here Saturday night after his third straight disappointing finish in the early voting states. “The people of Iowa and New Hampshire and South Carolina have spoken, and I really respect their decision.” Mr. Bush’s campaign had ...

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Photo Credit: Reuters Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump rolled to victory on Saturday in South Carolina in a contest that saw former Florida Governor Jeb Bush drop out, while Democratic hopeful Hillary Clinton beat back a strong challenge from Bernie Sanders in Nevada. The victories by Trump, who is running as an anti-establishment outsider, and Clinton, a preeminent political insider, solidified their positions as the front-runners to win their parties' respective nominations ahead of the Nov. 8 presidential election. By winning both South Carolina and New Hampshire and holding leads in 13 states that hold Republican contests on March 1, Trump was arguably on track to win the nomination, an outcome that seemed astounding to contemplate when he entered the race last summer. "It's going to be very difficult for him to be derailed at this point," said Hogan Gidley, who was a senior adviser to former Republican candidate Mike Huckabee. The 69-year-old real ...

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New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, who once looked like a front-runner for the Republican presidential nomination but was hampered from the start of his campaign by a traffic scandal and a sluggish economy at home, dropped out of the race on Wednesday. His departure followed a disappointing sixth-place finish in Tuesday’s New Hampshire primary, on which he had staked his White House hopes. “I ran for president with the message that the government needs to once again work for the people, not the people work for the government,” Christie said on Facebook. “And while running for president I tried to reinforce what I have always believed – that speaking your mind matters, that experience matters, that competence matters and that it will always matter in leading our nation. That message was heard by and stood for by a lot of people, but just not enough and that’s ok.” “I have both won elections ...

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Photo Credit: Getty Images Donald J. Trump and Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont harnessed working-class fury on Tuesday to surge to commanding victories in aNew Hampshire primary that drew a huge turnout across the state. Mr. Trump, the wealthy businessman whose blunt language and outsider image have electrified many Republicans and horrified others, benefited from an unusually large field of candidates that split the vote among traditional politicians like Gov. John Kasich of Ohio, who finished second, and former Gov. Jeb Bush of Florida. But Mr. Trump also tapped into a deep well of anxiety among Republicans and independents in New Hampshire, according to exit polling data, and he ran strongest among voters who were worried about illegal immigrants, incipient economic turmoil and the threat of a terrorist attack in the United States. As polls closed, is it revealed that Mr. Trump had received 35 percent of the vote, and Mr. Sanders approached ...

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Photo Credit: ABC News The ABC debate at St. Anselm's College in New Hampshire begun with much confusion. The debate began on a bizarre note with several candidates, including Trump and Carson, apparently not hearing their introduction amid the noise of the crowd at St. Anselm's College. Both stood awkwardly in the wings as other candidates including Rubio and Bush pushed past them. Then Ohio Gov. John Kasich apparently was not introduced at all, and had to be called on stage by moderator David Muir. Things didn't get much better for Ben Carson after that. He once again was absent from the conversation for long stretches of time. In his closing statement, he told the audience: "I'm still here, and I'm not going any place either." The main storyline surrounded republican contender Marco Rubio, who came under assault from New Jersey Governor Chris Christie over his level of experience as a first-term ...

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As the Iowa caucuses drew to a close, it saw an upset victory for Republican Senator Ted Cruz over front-runner Donald Trump, while a virtual tie between Hillary Clinton and rival Bernie Sanders. This is very much an interesting development, as Presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders was able to catch up with Clinton in Iowa despite polls showing him at least 40 points behind some few months ago. Four in 10 caucus-goers voted for the first time, a segment that overwhelmingly favoured Sanders. More than one in four Democratic voters listed income inequality as the election’s top issue. Some Democratic caucus sites decided their winner with a coin toss. In all six situations, Clinton won. However, it has been generally agreed that Bernie Sanders has won - in terms of how far his underdog journey has taken him to, and the man himself could not hold back his excitement. “We went up against the most powerful ...

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Photo Credit: US News As the Iowa caucuses begins its drawdown, most Politicians are clamouring for a piece of media action - but not Donald Trump. What made Thursday Night's debate one of the most unusual debate nights in history was that it was a showdown without a front-runner. Donald Trump skipped the debate, claiming Fox News and moderator Megyn Kelly were biased against him. That left seven rivals on stage, just four days before the Iowa caucuses: Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio, Ben Carson, Chris Christie, Jeb Bush, John Kasich and Rand Paul. Trump held his own event at the same time at Drake University, setting up a split-screen kind of evening. Below are some of the key highlights that happened during the debates. Mockery of Donald Trump continues Ted Cruz, who is very much expected to win the Iowa Primary, opened the debate with a sarcastic impression of Donald Trump's frequent insults of his opponents. "I'm a ...

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Seven Republican presidential candidates will participate in Fox Business Network's prime-time debate on Thursday, but Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky and former business executive Carly Fiorina did not qualify for the main event, the network said on Monday. The seven candidates chosen for the main debate by Fox Business, based on the network's polling criteria, were billionaire businessman Donald Trump, Texas Senator Ted Cruz, Florida Senator Marco Rubio, retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson, New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, former Florida Governor Jeb Bush and Ohio Governor John Kasich. Debate host Fox Business Network announced the debate lineup Monday evening, dealing a blow to both candidates three weeks before Iowa's leadoff presidential caucuses. Just seven candidates — the smallest Republican group so far — will be featured in Thursday's 9 p.m. ET main event, based on criteria established by the network that relied on recent polls. Fiorina, former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee and former Pennsylvania ...

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Photo Credit: AP Photo/Susan Walsh Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus stated on Wednesday that party leaders are expecting to see a nominee for the 2016 Elections for President by mid April and that a nominating convention is still not excluded as a possibility. According to Reuters, Priebus was a guest on CBS’s “this Morning” where he answered questions a day after the last Republican Presidential debate in Las Vegas and said there could be a brokered convention in July if none of the White House hopefuls gets enough support to win the nomination. He also stated “I think most likely we will have a presumptive nominee by mid-April”, and when asked about a possible convention he said “I highly doubt it.” The nomination can be won by winning the delegates before the national convention of the party. If the candidates do not gather enough delegates in state primary elections and caucuses, ...

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(Photo Credit: Mark J. Terril/AP)  Former Florida Governor Jeb Bush reiterated his attack on rival Republican candidate for President Marco Rubio, for missing Senate votes and contributing to the Washington gridlock. Bush attacked Rubio for not demonstrating the leadership needed to surpass the partisan division and said that he does not have the level of accomplishment to really be in the White House. According to Reuters, while being on NBC’s “Meet the Press” on Sunday Bush stated “In this era of gridlock, it’s really hard to break through and I think he’s given up. And I think that’s the wrong thing to do.” He added “this is about public service, about solving problems. I can change the culture in Washington.” Bush and Rubio clashed over this matter at the last Republican Presidential debate, when Jeb Bush criticized Marco Rubio for missing Senate votes because of his campaigning schedule and even suggested that ...

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