Photo Credit: Reuters Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump rolled to victory on Saturday in South Carolina in a contest that saw former Florida Governor Jeb Bush drop out, while Democratic hopeful Hillary Clinton beat back a strong challenge from Bernie Sanders in Nevada. The victories by Trump, who is running as an anti-establishment outsider, and Clinton, a preeminent political insider, solidified their positions as the front-runners to win their parties' respective nominations ahead of the Nov. 8 presidential election. By winning both South Carolina and New Hampshire and holding leads in 13 states that hold Republican contests on March 1, Trump was arguably on track to win the nomination, an outcome that seemed astounding to contemplate when he entered the race last summer. "It's going to be very difficult for him to be derailed at this point," said Hogan Gidley, who was a senior adviser to former Republican candidate Mike Huckabee. The 69-year-old real ...

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Photo Credit: Getty South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley, viewed as a possible Republican vice presidential candidate, endorsed U.S. Senator Marco Rubio on Wednesday for their party's 2016 White House nomination, three days before the state's presidential primary. "If we elect Marco Rubio, every day will be a great day in America," Haley said with Rubio at her side at an event in Chapin, South Carolina. Haley's endorsement gave Rubio, 44, a valuable ally to try to sway voters in South Carolina, the third contest after Iowa and New Hampshire to pick a party nominee for the Nov. 8 presidential election to succeed Democratic President Barack Obama. Rubio is seeking to take second or third place in South Carolina's Republican primary on Saturday and potentially emerge as the main Republican establishment alternative to front-runner Donald Trump, who has a big lead in the state. "I can't tell you how honored I am to get the ...

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 If Republican Debates were not confrontational enough, last night's CBS News debates marked a more personal mud fest between the contenders. The most important exchange of the evening came early in the night, when Donald J. Trump and Jeb Bush, a former governor of Florida, collided in an extended, personal clash over the Iraq war and President George W. Bush’s record on national security. But for all of the candidates, the debate helped illustrate the broader state of the race, and each man’s approach to the final seven days before the crucial South Carolina primary on Saturday. Jeb Bush Is Finally Going for It After stalling and sputtering in his past confrontations with Mr. Trump, Mr. Bush came into Greenville eager for a fight. He went at Mr. Trump repeatedly, assailing him as insensitive to women and minorities, and criticizing his support for using eminent domain to annex private property. In South Carolina, a ...

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Photo Credit: ABC News The ABC debate at St. Anselm's College in New Hampshire begun with much confusion. The debate began on a bizarre note with several candidates, including Trump and Carson, apparently not hearing their introduction amid the noise of the crowd at St. Anselm's College. Both stood awkwardly in the wings as other candidates including Rubio and Bush pushed past them. Then Ohio Gov. John Kasich apparently was not introduced at all, and had to be called on stage by moderator David Muir. Things didn't get much better for Ben Carson after that. He once again was absent from the conversation for long stretches of time. In his closing statement, he told the audience: "I'm still here, and I'm not going any place either." The main storyline surrounded republican contender Marco Rubio, who came under assault from New Jersey Governor Chris Christie over his level of experience as a first-term ...

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Photo Credit: AP With just three days before Iowans head to the caucuses, new data could bring new clarity to  a number of major questions about the state of the 2016 presidential races. Barring unforeseen circumstances, Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are positioned to win in Iowa, according to a spate of new polls. In the Iowa Republican primary, the race for months has been Trump versus everyone else. While Texas Senator Ted Cruz briefly challenged the front-runner for first place in Iowa, one of the race’s earliest primaries, Trump seems to have recovered a lead well outside the margin of error, according to most of the surveys released in the past week. Trump leads Cruz, 30 percent to 23 percent, in a Monmouth University poll, 31 percent to 23 percent in a Public Policy Polling survey and 32 percent to 25 percent in the jointly-sponsored NBC News/Wall Street Journal/Marist poll, for an average lead ...

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Photo Credit: US News As the Iowa caucuses begins its drawdown, most Politicians are clamouring for a piece of media action - but not Donald Trump. What made Thursday Night's debate one of the most unusual debate nights in history was that it was a showdown without a front-runner. Donald Trump skipped the debate, claiming Fox News and moderator Megyn Kelly were biased against him. That left seven rivals on stage, just four days before the Iowa caucuses: Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio, Ben Carson, Chris Christie, Jeb Bush, John Kasich and Rand Paul. Trump held his own event at the same time at Drake University, setting up a split-screen kind of evening. Below are some of the key highlights that happened during the debates. Mockery of Donald Trump continues Ted Cruz, who is very much expected to win the Iowa Primary, opened the debate with a sarcastic impression of Donald Trump's frequent insults of his opponents. "I'm a ...

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Photo Credits: AP Politicians in the US have blocked a bill that would have made it harder for Syrian and Iraqi refugees to enter the country. The result of Wednesday’s vote was 55-43, with "yes" votes falling short of the 60 needed after Democrats refused to support the Republican-backed measure in the 100-member Senate. No Republicans voted against the bill, and only two Democrats backed it. Among other things, the bill would have required high-level US officials to verify that each refugee from Iraq and Syria posed no security risk before they were allowed into the US. Republicans said the tighter screening was essential to ensure the safety of Americans and prevent attacks within the country by Islamic State and other militant groups. "This bipartisan bill would allow Washington to step back, take a breath and ensure it has the correct policies and security screenings in place," Republican Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said in the ...

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Seven Republican presidential candidates will participate in Fox Business Network's prime-time debate on Thursday, but Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky and former business executive Carly Fiorina did not qualify for the main event, the network said on Monday. The seven candidates chosen for the main debate by Fox Business, based on the network's polling criteria, were billionaire businessman Donald Trump, Texas Senator Ted Cruz, Florida Senator Marco Rubio, retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson, New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, former Florida Governor Jeb Bush and Ohio Governor John Kasich. Debate host Fox Business Network announced the debate lineup Monday evening, dealing a blow to both candidates three weeks before Iowa's leadoff presidential caucuses. Just seven candidates — the smallest Republican group so far — will be featured in Thursday's 9 p.m. ET main event, based on criteria established by the network that relied on recent polls. Fiorina, former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee and former Pennsylvania ...

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Photo credit: BBC and Getty Images Donald Trump suggested in an interview that Ted Cruz’s ability to run for the GOP nomination is in jeopardy because he has a crippling weakness. Trump maintains that, not being born in the United States, Cruz could be “tied up” in the court for at least two years and that this is a “big problem”. Cruz was born in Canada to an American mother and Cuban father. Legal consensus has it that Cruz is an American citizen through and through. Yet Trump is determined to make Cruz’s citizenship an issue. Cruz says he is determined to “laugh it off and move on to the issues that matter.” The remarks came as the race for the Iowa primary heats up. Cruz is leading the polls, threatening Trump’s number 1 position. The first delegate selection contest will be held on 1 Feb. This is not the first time Trump ...

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The Washington Post published a political cartoon mocking Republican Presidential hopeful Ted Cruz for using his children as puppets at his campaign trail. The cartoon triggered a debate over the role of children in American Presidential campaigns. The political cartoon was done by Pulitzer Prize winner Ann Telnaes who portrayed Senator Cruz as an organ grinder and his two daughters as monkeys. The cartoon was done after Cruz issued a new campaign TV ad in which he and his wife along with his two young daughters featured in a Christmas story ad with two titles “How Obamacare Stole Christmas” and “The Grinch Who Lost Her Emails”, taking a dig at Democratic Presidential frontrunner Hillary Clinton and her email controversy while being Secretary of State. According to Reuters, Ann Telnaes stated that she did nothing wrong portraying Cruz’s children in such a way, because he was first to use them in his campaign ...

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